Everest women’s seven summits eco-action tour

In May 2008 this team of inspiring young women became the most successful women’s expedition ever to Summit Mt Everest.  Against all kinds of socio-economic odds the team succeeded in doing what none thought possible.  All of them reached the summit and spread the message of ‘Unity in Diversity’ from the top of the world.

During that expedition the issue of climate change struck the members deeply, and subsequent travels across the country motivating students allowed them to witness further instances of the serious effects of climate change.  So with the first, and arguably the most challenging summit behind them the climbers have now taken up a mission that is both meaningful and helpful not just in Nepal but globally.

The members of the team are Asha Kumari Singh, Chunu Shrestha, Maya Gurung, Ngabhang Phuti Sherpa, Nimdoma Sherpa, Pema Diki Sherpa, Pujan Acharya, Shailee Basnet and Usha Bist. Each of these young women has her own compelling story of struggle, challenges, hope and determination. Born of poor parents, one started supporting her family when she was in the sixth grade. Another ran away from home to unknown destination to escape forced marriage at the age of fourteen. Their backgrounds combined with the previous success and a new vision makes this global expedition, led by such intrepid young women quite unique.

The Seven Summits Eco-Action kick-started in Australia on the 29th of June.  The team fly into Sydney and travel down to the south coast of NSW and then up to the alpine region, to climb Mt Kosciuszko/ Targangil in early July.  They will be meeting with schools, environment groups, famous climbers, environmentalists, scientists and politicians during their tour, as well as speaking at several public events in Sydney, Canberra and Melbourne.

2010 marks the tenth anniversary of diplomatic relations being established between Australia and Nepal and a small ceremony to celebrate this will be held in Canberra where the team will present a token of commemoration to the Australian Government

The next peak in the challenge, Mt Elbrus in Europe, will be followed by Kilimanjaro (Africa), Vinson Massif (Antarctica), Aconcagua (South America), Carstensz Pyramid (Oceania) and Denali (North America). The team will be raising funds during their Australian trip to support future climbs.

The Australian part of the project is supported by Government of Nepal, Nepal Mountaineering Association, Nepal Tourism Year 2011, The North Face, The Crossing Land Education Trust, Outdoor Education Group, and the ‘Be Vegan, Go Green-Save the Planet’ campaign, Non-Residential Nepalis and Nari Nikunja.

The team has made the following vision and mission statements:

Vision: Providing hope to people and empowering them by sharing knowledge about tools for mitigation and adaptation through education and cross cultural learning in order to promote sustainable co-existence of nature and human beings.

Mission: Climb the seven summits, conduct educational exchange programmes on climate change in each continent and finally compile the global knowledge in educational materials including a book,  animations and posters which will be distributed in schools and libraries in various languages worldwide.

Everest Women’s Seven Summits
Eco-Action Web site:
http://www.sevensummitswomen.org

Australian contact:
Jenny McCracken,
Darebin Climate Action Network,
Phone:  0431 587830
Email; jam2arts@mac.com

Summary of Group Itinerary

29th June-4th July: arrive Sydney, travel to The Crossing Land Education Trust, Bermagui.
5th July-8th July:  In Jindabyne and Thredbo, climbing Mt Kosciuszko with and Bruce Easton from Wilderness and people from the Sports Outdoor Education Group. For local details, contact Bruce at Wilderness Sports: info@wildernesssports.com.au
9th-10th July: In Sydney with Nepali community

11th-12th July: In Canberra with Nepali Embassy

13th July onwards: In Victoria.
Mt Arapiles, then Melbourne with local climate action networks and Nepali community
18th July depart Australia, Melbourne.

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