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Mountain Journal

Environment, news, culture from the Australian Alps

Stockman mine proposal suspended

The Stockman Mine project has been proposed for an area about 60km by road north east of Omeo. The project contains two copper-zinc-lead-silver-gold rich deposits, called Wilga and Currawong. Wilga was discovered in 1978 and Currawong in 1979. Denehurst mined the copper rich core of Wilga deposit from 1992 to 1996. In 2006, following rehabilitation of the plant site and tailings dam by the Victorian Department of Primary Industries, the project was put out for public tender as part of an exploration incentive program. Jabiru Metals Limited (Jabiru) was awarded the project in March 2007.

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Ski mountaineering introduction courses

Main Range Backcountry is offering ski mountaineering courses this winter.

There will be four one day courses held this September, on the Main Range in the Snowy Mountains.

The course is designed to teach basic rope handling and movement on snow and ice with crampons and ice axes.

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Recruitment drive for Lake Mountain ski patrol

Lake Mountain Ski Patrol (LMSP) is gearing up for the 2016 winter season and has launched a recruitment drive for more volunteers to join its weekend team.

Volunteer patrollers need to be 18 years and older, and be fit, competent cross country skiers with a minimum Level 2 First Aid qualification.

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The Bigfoot Snow Trail

The Bigfoot Snow Trail is described as:

“A unique and spectacular event offering both a SnowMarathon and a SnowSprint event in Victoria’s beautiful Falls Creek Resort. Enjoy the magic of winter as you make your way across the high plains, exploring solo or with friends. This one of a kind event takes runners on an extraordinary journey, visiting historical huts and witnessing some of Australia’s highest peaks under snow. The views will give you that feeling of awe, the feeling that you are on top of the world”.

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A new road on Corn Hill?

Since 2008, the Mount Buller Mount Stirling Alpine Resort Management Board (MBMS ARMB) has been trying to build a Link Road between Mount Buller and Mount Stirling via Corn Hill. Mountain Journal has reported on this proposal.

In November 2015, the Planning Minister rejected the Link Road. And the Environment Minister stated “I don’t anticipate any further proposals of this nature.”

Now, Friends of Mt Stirling report:

Guess what ? We now have a new road across Corn Hill.

Continue reading “A new road on Corn Hill?”

Citizen science survey camp

 

The Goongerah Environment Centre (GECO) in East Gippsland is running another ‘citizen science’ weekend.

There will be workshops and practical sessions on forest ecology, threatened species, survey techniques, remote fauna cameras, nocturnal spotlighting, Owl surveys, Frog surveys and rainforest identification, forest carbon accounting and more.

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Update on the investigation into 2016 Tasmanian bushfires

Last summer saw some of the worst bushfires in Tasmania for decades. Fire services were overwhelmed and large areas of the World Heritage Area were badly burnt before authorities were able to bring the fires under control.

Fires impacted about 20,100 hectares, or 1.3 per cent, of the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area. The worst hit areas included Lake Mackenzie (13,822 hectares), Gordon River Road (3,520 hectares) and Maxwell River South (1,389 hectares).

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Backcountry film festival, Melbourne, May 2

Just a reminder that the 2016 showing of the Backcountry film festival hits Melbourne tonight (May 2).

Nine great films over 2 hours.

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90% of Snowy Mountains brumbies to be culled

The Guardian is reporting that 90% of the Snowy Mountains brumbies would be culled over the next two decades, under a plan released by the New South Wales government.

The draft wild horse management plan for Kosciuszko national park aims to cut the population of wild horses in the park from 6,000 to about 3,000 in the next five to 10 years.

The population would be dramatically slashed to just 600 within 20 years, confining the wild horses to three locations inside the national park.

Current numbers of wild horses were unsustainable and the animals were damaging the park’s fragile alpine and subalpine landscapes, the NSW environment minister, Mark Speakman, said.

 

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