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Mountain Journal

Environment, news, culture from the Australian Alps

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activism

Climb8: 700 kms across the Alps on snowshoes

Climb8 will be a long distance snowshoe expedition planned for the 2020 winter.
It aims to cross 36 summits, visit 8 ski resorts and carry out climate change research along the way.

Continue reading “Climb8: 700 kms across the Alps on snowshoes”

Logging stopped near Icy Creek

Forest Conservation Victoria reports that:

“Logging has been halted today in an area of forest at Icy Creek, along the main scenic tourist road out to Mt Baw Baw. A person is suspended 25 metres above the ground up a tree on a platform tied to logging machinery. Their actions are preventing the destruction of Ballantynes Saddle, which still remains after major decimation on the adjacent ridge.”

Ballantynes Saddle lies on the road to Mt Baw Baw between Icy Creek and the township of Tanjil Bren.

Continue reading “Logging stopped near Icy Creek”

Human sign on kunanyi/ Mt Wellington

There was a great turnout at the human sign event over the weekend to show opposition to the cable car planned for kunanyi/ Mt Wellington.

Check the video here.

For images, check the Respect The Mountain facebook page.

Background on the campaign available here.

IMAGE: Rob Blakers.

In the chaos, it’s important to remember the good stuff

Regardless of who wins the federal election, life will go on, and winter snows are getting closer. But it is still easy to get depressed about the chaotic state of federal politics, and the appalling lack of action on climate change that we have witnessed under the current Coalition government. Fires burnt large areas of the mountains this summer, there are ongoing attempts to allow commercial developments in national parks and other wild places, and feral horses have, in effect, been given protected status in Kosciuszko national park. Faced with ever more intense fire seasons, the forests are getting younger as we get older.

As the saying goes, ‘if you’re not outraged, you’re not paying attention.’ And, if you’re paying the slightest bit of attention to the natural world, then it’s normal to feel constant Solastalgia.

So, its important to hold hope and to pay attention to the good things that are happening. As Outside magazine recently reminded us, being out in nature is good for our bodies and also our emotional health. And there are also many good developments affecting the places that we love.

Continue reading “In the chaos, it’s important to remember the good stuff”

Adventurers for Climate Action

Anyone who spends time in wild nature knows that climate change is already impacting on the places we love. While for decades the primary political work of outdoor enthusiasts was to campaign for the protection of wild places through the creation of national parks and other reserves, now we need to also respond to the existential threat posed by unbridled climate change.

Older groups are shifting their focus to include acting on climate. For instance, the Wilderness Society, which has led so many campaigns to protect wild landscapes here in Australia, now has a strong focus on climate change. The wintersports group Protect our Winters (POW) is doing valuable work mobilising the skiing and riding communities and focusing them on decision makers.

Now another outdoor focused group – Adventurers for Climate Action – brings together the combined efforts of 10 organisations.

Continue reading “Adventurers for Climate Action”

‘The cure for depression is action’

In March this year, I sat on the summit of one of my favourite hills, Mt Blowhard, and watched the fires just to the south, which were in the Dargo River valley and burning up onto the Dargo High Plains. Already a mosaic of burnt and reburnt forest, now characterised by the grey trunks of burnt trees, I knew that this would be another wave of impact on these mountain forests. Some parts of north east VIC have now burnt more than three times in a bit over a decade. Scientists warn about the loss of alpine ash and snow gum if the frequency of fire continues to increase.

Continue reading “‘The cure for depression is action’”

Community protests start on kunanyi/ Mt Wellington

Developers continue to push their controversial plan to build a cable car up the main face of kunanyi (also known as Mt Wellington), above Hobart. But community opposition to the plan also continues to grow.

The developer may start test drilling soon. As a result, the community is mobilising and held the first ‘on ground’ protests (there have previously been rallies, meetings, etc). Recently the residents group Respect the Mountain hosted a picnic at the site of the proposed base station for the cable car.

They report:

We had a ‘great picnic in the peoples park today. We marked out the exact size of the MWCC’s planned ‘cable car (bus)’, this is 78 people inside that area on the slope / fire break where they plan to build their ‘base station’. Great spot for a picnic. Dumb spot for a car park and massive ‘base station’.

There’s plenty more to come – check the Respect the Mountain page for updates and to get involved.

 

Your mountain needs you

The campaign against the controversial proposal to build a cable car up the east face of kunanyi/ Mt Wellington, in Hobart, continues. It’s highly likely that this week the premier of Tasmania, Peter Gutwein, will sign off on the permit to allow Mount Wellington Cableway Company (MWCC) to begin drilling at 32 sites on the mountain. This means that work on the mountain could commence this month.

Local group Respect the Mountain – no cable car has issued a call for help at this pivotal moment in the campaign.

Continue reading “Your mountain needs you”

‘Giving climbers a platform to speak up about climate change’

Protect Our Winters (POW) is well known for its efforts to mobilise the snowsports community to be active on climate change issues.

Now they have launched POW Climb – describing it as ‘a unique division of the POW Alliance focused on engaging the climbing community in climate action’.

‘By highlighting the climate impacts most relevant to climbers, POW Climb works to connect the climbing community with opportunities for advocacy and activism while amplifying the community’s voice to affect systemic solutions to climate change’.

You can find out more about the program here.

“It’s time to give the climbing community a platform to speak up about climate change.”
– Tommy Caldwell

[IMAGE: POW]

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