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Mountain Journal

Environment, news, culture from the Australian Alps

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environment

Walk the Border, ACT

Almost every community environmental organisation struggles to get the funds they need to do their work effectively. We’re always looking for new ideas for fundraising, and this ‘walk the border’ idea stands out as a great initiative. It’s a fundraiser for the Conservation Council ACT Region and also a walk through some wonderful country.

It’s a 21 day journey along the 300 kilometre border of the ACT. The organisers say ‘The route will take in some of the ACT’s roughest and most beautiful country, including the source of the ACT’s water supply’. The walkers are currently about half way through the walk.

You can find full details on the walk below (including details on donating or joining the walk).

Continue reading “Walk the Border, ACT”

Cable car up kunanyi/ Mt Wellington one step closer

The Tasmanian government continues to help facilitate the development of a cable car up the side of kunanyi/ Mt Wellington, above Hobart.

There will be significant environmental impacts of this project and visual scarring of the mountain. Close to 1,500 people recently signed a petition against the proposal. A large majority of the 850 submissions made to a recent government process also opposed the plan. Yet the government continues to provide support for this damaging project: it has now tabled the legislation which will allow for the acquisition of public land for the cable car. The Govt has added the word ‘kunanyi’ into the title and little else has changed despite all the feedback it received on the draft legislation.

In an interesting development, the Hobart City Council says that a key reason given by the State Government for its legislation paving the way for a cable car on kunanyi/ Mt Wellington has ‘no weight’.

Tasmanian people: please make sure that your voice is heard by contacting the Legislative Council members to urge them to vote against the Bill. They will have the final say.

For further information check the page for Respect the Mountain.

Significant forest destruction proposed for Dinner Plain

Mountain Journal has previously reported on a plan to clear 1.8 hectares of Sub-alpine Woodland just adjacent to the Dinner Plain village to create an ‘Elite Training Facility’ (now called the ‘Village Green’).

The current proposal is to create a ‘large flat open grassed area approximately 90 m wide and 150 m long’. An access road and car parking along two sides of the grassed area are proposed, as well as public toilet facilities. A report prepared for Council describes it ‘as a community space (which) is large enough to facilitate sporting events such as polo, horse riding, and high altitude elite athlete training.’

Alpine Shire Council has committed to the delivery of $1,500,000 worth of capital works projects within Dinner Plain by 2027; and says that this will be funded by the Dinner Plain reserve (currently approximately $1,000,000) and additional funds as allocated by Council.

It now needs to decide whether to proceed with the proposal.

Continue reading “Significant forest destruction proposed for Dinner Plain”

Deer hunters want more access to Victorian wilderness

There is currently a parliamentary inquiry in Victoria into the control of invasive animals on Crown land. It is due to report back in March 2017.

Continue reading “Deer hunters want more access to Victorian wilderness”

A new road on Corn Hill?

Since 2008, the Mount Buller Mount Stirling Alpine Resort Management Board (MBMS ARMB) has been trying to build a Link Road between Mount Buller and Mount Stirling via Corn Hill. Mountain Journal has reported on this proposal.

In November 2015, the Planning Minister rejected the Link Road. And the Environment Minister stated “I don’t anticipate any further proposals of this nature.”

Now, Friends of Mt Stirling report:

Guess what ? We now have a new road across Corn Hill.

Continue reading “A new road on Corn Hill?”

Mt Stirling tree gets a nomination

If you’ve ever walked up Mt Stirling, its very hard to miss the ‘Stirling tree’ – a lone snow gum that stands towards the south peak of the mountain and is visible from the four wheel drive track that passes over the summit.

I often sit by the tree and never fail to be amazed by how many 4WD’s drive over the mountain, without the occupants ever stopping, let alone walking around. The views from Mt Stirling are superb, sitting in a huge ring of mountains that stretch from Mt Skene around to Howitt, all the way across to Buffalo Plateau. The tree draws your gaze and is a popular spot for many walkers as they wander around the summit area.

Continue reading “Mt Stirling tree gets a nomination”

New system for fuel reduction burns in Victoria

The Victorian government has announced changes to how fuel reduction burns (‘controlled burning’) will be carried out in the state.

Since the Black Saturday fires of 2009, public land managers have been seeking to burn 5% of public land each year. This has been criticised for being a very blunt management instrument for a complex problem. There are concerns that burning regimes have been inappropriate for some types of vegetation, causing ecological damage, and have not been able to reduce overall fire risk in the state.

Continue reading “New system for fuel reduction burns in Victoria”

Defending the Jumbo Valley

The Jumbo Valley, located deep in the wilds of British Columbia’s Purcell Mountains, has long been revered for its spiritual significance and beauty. To the Ktunaxa Nation, it is known as Qat’muk, home of the grizzly bear spirit.

For decades, First Nations, conservationists, backcountry skiers and snowboarders have fought a proposed large-scale ski resort deep in the Jumbo valley. After 24 years of opposition, what more will it take to keep Jumbo wild for good?

Jumbo Wild is a beautiful film about the plan for – and the campaign against – this major development.

Continue reading “Defending the Jumbo Valley”

Review: Mountain Ash: Fire, Logging and the Future of Victoria’s Giant Forests

David Lindenmayer is the renowned specialist on the critically endangered Leadbeater’s Possum and the Mountain Ash forests that are their home. He has collaborated with other researchers to produce a book which looks at the possums future in light of fires and logging.

While it is expensive (almost $60) it is an incredibly important contribution to our knowledge about these forests. It is available from the CSIRO.

The following review was written by Alex Mullarky, and originally published on the Wild Melbourne website.

Continue reading “Review: Mountain Ash: Fire, Logging and the Future of Victoria’s Giant Forests”

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