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Mountain Journal

Environment, news, culture from the Australian Alps

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mountains

World Mountain Day

World Mountain Day is on December 11. While it has a theme each year (see below), for me it’s a chance to reflect on how much mountains influence my life and how much I enjoy being in them.

Wherever you are, I hope you have a great day.

According to the United Nations, the theme in 2016 is:

“Mountain Cultures: Celebrating diversity and strengthening identity”

Covering around 22 percent of the earth’s land surface, mountains play a critical role in moving the world towards sustainable economic growth. They not only provide sustenance and wellbeing to 915 million mountain people around the world, representing 13 percent of global population, but mountains also indirectly benefit billions more living downstream.

Mountain Cultures

This year, the celebration of this Day aims to highlight Mountain Cultures. Mountains host communities with ancient cultures and traditions, and are places of religious worship, pilgrimage and rituals all over the world. The concept of traditional heritage, culture and spirituality is intrinsically linked with peoples’ livelihoods in the mountains, where it is often traditional lifestyles that determine the way people make a living and subsist.

[IMAGE: Mt Geryon in Tasmania is one of my favourite mountains].

 

The Mountain Legacy Project

The Mountain Legacy Project, or MLP, is “an interdisciplinary collaboration focused on exploring change in Canada’s mountain environments. Utilizing over 140,000 images taken by land surveyors from 1861 – 1953, MLP researchers seek to re-photograph these images as accurately as possible and make the resulting image pairs available for further investigation”.

It compares the original landscape shown in the early photos with ones taken in the same place over the past few years. It allows you look at the changes in many thousands of places – mountains, valleys and so on – over time. And the results are incredible. While it documents the development of towns, roads, changes in land management, the impact of logging operations and wildfire, etc, the most striking aspect is the change to snowpack and ice fields during this time.

Continue reading “The Mountain Legacy Project”

Highline Magazine signs off

One of the inspirations for Mountain Journal was a magazine that came out of Colorado called the Mountain Gazette. The Gazette lived through various incarnations from the early 1970s onwards and was, in the words of one of its founders, “generally about the mountains”. Quirky, alternative, sometimes very political, and with fantastic writing about life in the mountains and the landscapes that sustain and draw people to that part of the world. It had fantastic covers, with wonderfully evocative art work.

Continue reading “Highline Magazine signs off”

International Mountain Day 2015

December 11 is designated by the UN as International Mountain Day.

Here’s a few facts from the UN:

“Covering around 22 percent of the earth’s land surface, mountains play a critical role in moving the world towards sustainable economic growth. They not only provide sustenance and wellbeing to 915 million mountain people around the world, representing 13 percent of global population, but indirectly benefit billions more living downstream”.

Where ever you are, I hope you’re out in the hills and having a great day. Please feel free to post some pics of your favourite mountains on our facebook page.

Appreciating the Home Range

As a keen skier and walker I love to visit some of the higher ranges around the world. But having done lots of overseas trips I figure I’ve consumed well beyond a fair share of carbon, and tend to stick close to home for my adventures nowadays.

Continue reading “Appreciating the Home Range”

Mt Geryon

I don’t know any Indigenous stories about Mt Geryon, in the southern end of Tasmania’s Cradle Mountain Lake St Clair National Park. But I do often wonder what it must have been like for the people’s who lived and passed through the incredible mountain country of central western Tasmania. To approach this mountain up Pine Valley and finally to reach the small clearing (the old ‘climbers camp’) where the bulky western face suddenly reveals itself is always an impressive, and to me, spiritual, experience. I wonder if they climbed this peak.

So many of the features of this region have been loaded down with Biblical titles or names from the Greek Classics, something that irks me whenever I scan the map or skyline. There are some great names: I love Innes High Rocky in the south west. And closer to Geryon, there is Fury Gorge, Pencil Pine Bluff, Cathedral Mountain, High Dome, Walled Mountain, The Never Never, and the beautifully appropriate Pool of Memories. These names evoke something of the place. Peaks named after early explorers also make sense. But just reeling off a list of names from western mythology seems lazy and disrespectful. But I can live with Geryon. The three-bodied giant of Greek Mythology.

It is such a dramatic mountain, squeezed up the end of Pine Valley up against the Ducane range, and hidden in behind the bulkier looking Acropolis when seen from lake St Clair. It provides a dramatic and other worldly aspect to dinner when you’re sitting in Bert Nichols hut on the Overland track. If the word charismatic can be applied to a mountain, then it certainly applies to Geryon. Its dramatic rocky faces on the east and west constantly change their moods and even from The Labyrinth it presents itself as a ‘real’ mountain, with another thousand feet of cliffs and dramatic skyline above the Labyrinth plateau. It can be mild in The Labyrinth and storming up on Geryon and the Ducane Range. The Cephessis scree, which runs from the base of the western face down almost to Cephissus Creek, is an amazing feature, and acts as a giant staircase that leads you right to the cliffs.

Full story here.

Mt Wellington cable car proposal looking less likely

There is a welcome development regarding the cable car which is planned for Mt Wellington (kunanyi). It has been long resisted by local residents.

The Tasmanian Planning Commission has recently announced the findings of a review it had carried out into the planning process. It found that there had been significant problems in the planning process around this development. It is now up to the Wellington Park Management Trust to decide whether to rezone the development boundary on the pinnacle in order to allow for a commercial ‘pinnacle centre’ to be located just above the organ pipes and a cable car on the face of Mt Wellington.

The following comes from Residents Opposing the Cable Car (ROCC).

Continue reading “Mt Wellington cable car proposal looking less likely”

‘The Mountain’ book launch tonight

Five years in the making, The Mountain is the first photographer’s monograph on Mt Wellington in nearly 20 years.

Mark Clemens has created a superb photographic collection highlighting the uniqueness of this wild place on Hobart’s back doorstep with a foreword by award winning Tasmanian novelist, Heather Rose.

A photographic evocation of the Mountain’s own intrinsic nature: it lets the Mountain have its own voice and tell its own story.

The Mountain is Hardback $49.95, and is printed in Hobart to the highest specs.

Part of the proceeds go to the Tasmanian Land Conservancy.

Reservation essential to:   rsvp@fullersbookshop.com.au   or (03) 6234 3800

THE MOUNTAIN
BY MARK CLEMENS
BOOK LAUNCH

Follow The Mountain on facebook.com

WHEN

September 18, 2014 at 5:30pm – 6:30pm

WHERE

Fullers Bookshop
131 Collins St
Hobart, Tasmania 7000

 

Wellington Park Management Trust weighs up cable car expansion request

The following comes from The Mercury newspaper. Journalist is Michelle Paine.

You may want to add a comment to The Mercury article.

For background to this issue, please check here.

A CABLE car on Mt Wellington is a step closer as the public is called to comment on extending the summit’s development zone.

The Wellington Park Management Trust has agreed to evaluate the proposal to enlarge the Pinnacle Specific Area, which allows development.

The Mt Wellington Cableway Co requested the boundary be moved to accommodate a cable car.

Trust chair Christine Mucha said it did not mean the trust was supporting any particular development.

The change would extend the area by about 60m east of the observation shelter.

Dr Mucha said that after consultation, the trust would prepare a report for the Tasmanian Planning Commission.

“While we recognise the strong sentiment against the potential for future development in the Pinnacle Specific Area, the trust believes that the management plan enables such proposals to be considered and assessed in accordance with the performance standards contained in the plan,’’ Dr Mucha said.

MWCC project lead Adrian Bold said it was a positive step.

“We’re following proper process. They had to agree with our rationale. Now there will be a process that involves the public,’’ Mr Bold said.

He said enlarging the boundary was extra work but would mean the cable car would have less visual impact.

Residents Opposed to the Cable Car spokesman Ted Cutlan said he was appalled at the trust’s “rubber stamp’’.

“They’re bending the management plan to fit the development,’’ Mr Cutlan said.

“This is one step along the way. The developer has to put in a development application that would fit the plan.’’

 

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